Using the Pandemic for Good

We’re all experiencing something we’ve never encountered before, and it’s more than a little disconcerting. We like having our ducks all in a row, don’t we? How do we operate daily in a bubble without knowing what lurks on the horizon? None of this took God by surprise. He knew this coronavirus thing was sweeping down the plain. We can focus on the negative and work ourselves into a frenzy, but God wants to use every bit of it for good. How can this hiccup—or mountain!—be for your family’s benefit? Let me offer a few thoughts. It’s a time to…

1. Teach your kids those things you’ve never had time to before. I’m sure you appreciate your children’s teachers, and they deserve it. Yes, there’s school curriculum to learn, but think about those skills every person should know. Now’s a good time to show them how to sew on a button, do laundry, or cook a meal. Envision your children living by themselves in an apartment someday. What tasks would impede them? You can develop your kiddos into independent survivors.

2. Make your home the cleanest it’s ever been. Implement a weekly chore day, assigning jobs not only that have been overlooked or postponed but duties that teach your children how to clean. Little kids can reach low places such as baseboards and doorknobs while older ones can complete most any task. Once everyone is done, have a movie marathon or take turns picking a game to play.

3. Be a cool mom. Don’t allocate all of your energy to schoolwork or household management. Let loose and have fun! Play tag or create an obstacle course in the backyard, stay up late one night with popcorn and a movie, sing silly songs, dance, host a lip sync contest, play charades, create a treasure map, act out biblical stories, and so much more. Have your family brainstorm ideas, write them down, cut them apart, and put them in a jar. Every day draw one and be crazy.

4. Serve others. How can you bless others during this quarantine? Have your children draw pictures and write notes to mail to a local nursing home because they aren’t allowed any visitors. Weed your neighbor’s flower bed, or ring the doorbell and wave at them from the sidewalk just so they have human connection. 

When your children look back on this season of their life, let them reminisce fondly and say, “Do you remember when the whole world went crazy, but we had the best time as a family and spending time with our mom?” And I hope you can look back on these few weeks and warmheartedly recall that it was one of the greatest experiences with your children. Use the pandemic for good to enrich your family. 


About Shelley Pulliam   Read more by this author...

Howdy! (A girl from Oklahoma has to use this as her greeting) I’m Shelley Pulliam, executive director of Arise Ministries and former teacher of hormone-filled 8th graders. But my real claim to fame rests in my award as second grade spelling bee champ and my recent gun-handling skills as I train to competition shoot. It helps me be on guard when Satan comes knocking. I’m a voracious reader and can frequently be found at the theater enjoying movie marathons where my record stands at six in one day. I’m a single, never married, who loves to pour into children at every opportunity. Let me know if you have any for sale. You can connect with me on social media. https://www.instagram.com/shelleypulliam/

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